Oberlin College

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Posts tagged women

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jacquelynn:

I am not a professor. I work with computers, people in which profession, I’m frequently told, are highly in demand. I could easily work in corporate America or in the non-profit sector. But I don’t. I work in academia because I believe in the power of education and further, I believe in the values that my institution has historically supported and strives to uphold today. 
I didn’t attend Oberlin as a student but I can say with one hundred percent certainty that my time here as an employee has changed me for the better.  
Despite the fact that I’m largely a cynical realist, there’re a few remaining places where a shred of idealism shines through. This isn’t about what job I think you can get with a college degree. Neither is it about the barriers preventing some people from entering universities like the one I work for. There is still work to be done. But I maintain a simple and perhaps naïve belief that reading, thinking, arguing, and agreeing force us to grow as people and institutions that provide environments to do that help move humanity forward.
And today, when I walked by this gate in front of the art building on campus, I remembered why I do the work that I do and that I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute my small part.

This. All of this. *shivers*

jacquelynn:

I am not a professor. I work with computers, people in which profession, I’m frequently told, are highly in demand. I could easily work in corporate America or in the non-profit sector. But I don’t. I work in academia because I believe in the power of education and further, I believe in the values that my institution has historically supported and strives to uphold today. 

I didn’t attend Oberlin as a student but I can say with one hundred percent certainty that my time here as an employee has changed me for the better.  

Despite the fact that I’m largely a cynical realist, there’re a few remaining places where a shred of idealism shines through. This isn’t about what job I think you can get with a college degree. Neither is it about the barriers preventing some people from entering universities like the one I work for. There is still work to be done. But I maintain a simple and perhaps naïve belief that reading, thinking, arguing, and agreeing force us to grow as people and institutions that provide environments to do that help move humanity forward.

And today, when I walked by this gate in front of the art building on campus, I remembered why I do the work that I do and that I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute my small part.

This. All of this. *shivers*

Filed under oberlin oberlin college Gateway to Knowledge women education academia

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Archive Dirt: “Oberlin women are not exempt from cultural conditioning. We had...

oberlinactivisthistory:

“Oberlin women are not exempt from cultural conditioning. We had dolls, chalk boards and tea sets when our brothers had cars, baseball bats and erector sets. Deep down there is a feeling that men are really more suited to lead an intellectual community or to compete in the marketplace, if not by…

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin college archives college archives archives oberlin history history oberlin review women

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From her earliest days Oberlin has been known as a radical institution. Her noble work in the cause of civil rights, and the high position which she has accorded to women are significant examples of this fact. But now that these issues have been settled, and the principles for which she has contended, have been recognized, there is the danger of our being satisfied with the achievements of the past, and of lapsing into a state of conservatism.
Editorial, Oberlin Review, Volume One, Number One, 1874, reprinted in 90 year Review issue February 12, 1965 (via oberlinactivisthistory)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin college archives college archives archives oberlin review oberlin history radical civil rights women activism

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Waking Life: Cool Female Thing Of The Week

spinning-while-falling-down:

Oberlin College and The First Women Graduates

From its opening in 1833, Oberlin College Admitted Women to their school, a rare thing in that time. Although their classes were with men, their diplomas were in a degree called “Ladies Courses”. In 1937, four women, Mary Kellogg, Mary Caroline Rudd, Mary Hosford and Elizabeth Prall enrolled in Oberlin and all except Kellogg (who left due to lack of funds, but later returned and married a president of the college) graduated in 1841. Going even farther than that in 1862 Oberlin college gave Mary Jane Patterson became the first African-American woman to earn a college degree. Although women had to cook and clean at the school, it was an amazing step in women’s history, and set the stage for women today to be enrolled in American Higher Education.

This is also incredibly important because while it opened doors, there are still schools that didn’t admit women until very recently. The Citadel didn’t admit its first women until 1994.

The monument “Gateway to Knowledge” near the Venturi addition of the art building commemorates our first graduating class of women. Hurray!

(Source: oberlin.edu)

Filed under Feminism Oberlin College Women's History Women's Rights oberlin women