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amamblog:

Now you see it…: Immediately following Commencement/Reunion Weekend, the exhibition Religion, Ritual and Performance in Modern and Contemporary Art closed and we began preparing the gallery for next year’s show Modern and Contemporary Realisms. Our wonderful “scribble” drawing by Sol LeWitt has now been covered over by a temporary wall in preparation for that installation.The wall drawing was created by LeWitt specifically for the museum’s Ellen Johnson Gallery as part of a 2007 exhibition, Sol LeWitt at the AMAM, which featured other works by LeWitt from the AMAM collection, along with loans from the LeWitt Collection. When LeWitt died at the age of seventy-eight, shortly after the exhibition opened, it became a memorial to the artist and his legacy. The “scribble” drawing, which measures twenty-two feet high, was a gift from the artist and among the very last of his wall drawings. LeWitt gave instructions to teams of people - in Oberlin’s case, members of his studio, Oberlin students, community members, and students from other colleges - for such drawings, which took weeks to execute, always giving the teams “wiggle room” and insisting that their input made a vital contribution to the final artwork.
To see images from the original installation and read more about how it was created, you can visit an earlier blog post here.
Image:Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)Wall Drawing #1222 (Scribbles: Curved Horizontal Bands), 2007Black graphite pencil Gift of the Artist, AMAM 2007.5

amamblog:

Now you see it…: Immediately following Commencement/Reunion Weekend, the exhibition Religion, Ritual and Performance in Modern and Contemporary Art closed and we began preparing the gallery for next year’s show Modern and Contemporary RealismsOur wonderful “scribble” drawing by Sol LeWitt has now been covered over by a temporary wall in preparation for that installation.

The wall drawing was created by LeWitt specifically for the museum’s Ellen Johnson Gallery as part of a 2007 exhibition, Sol LeWitt at the AMAM, which featured other works by LeWitt from the AMAM collection, along with loans from the LeWitt Collection. When LeWitt died at the age of seventy-eight, shortly after the exhibition opened, it became a memorial to the artist and his legacy. The “scribble” drawing, which measures twenty-two feet high, was a gift from the artist and among the very last of his wall drawings. LeWitt gave instructions to teams of people - in Oberlin’s case, members of his studio, Oberlin students, community members, and students from other colleges - for such drawings, which took weeks to execute, always giving the teams “wiggle room” and insisting that their input made a vital contribution to the final artwork.

To see images from the original installation and read more about how it was created, you can visit an earlier blog post here.

Image:
Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)
Wall Drawing #1222 (Scribbles: Curved Horizontal Bands), 2007
Black graphite pencil 
Gift of the Artist, AMAM 2007.5

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art museum art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum sol lewitt installation

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amamblog:

Our March “First Thursday” evening hours return! On March 1, all museum galleries will be open until 8pm.For this evening, we welcome a performance by the Oberlin College student string quartet Chartreuse, who will be performing the Minimalist composition “Different Trains,” written by Steve Reich in 1988. This performance will be introduced by Sarah Hamill, Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, who will situate it in the context of minimalist sculptures on view in the Ellen Johnson Gallery. The performance will begin at 6pm, and will last around 25 minutes.Oberlin College student docents will also be on hand throughout the evening to answer questions and show visitors around the museum. Also available will be the AMAM’s audio tour and Family Self-Guides. Hope to see you Thursday!Image:Sol LeWitt (American, 1928 - 2007)49 Three-Part Variations on Three Different Kinds of Cubes, 1967-71Enamel on steel Fund for Contemporary Art, 1972AMAM 1972.77 

amamblog:

Our March “First Thursday” evening hours return! On March 1, all museum galleries will be open until 8pm.

For this evening, we welcome a performance by the Oberlin College student string quartet Chartreuse, who will be performing the Minimalist composition “Different Trains,” written by Steve Reich in 1988. This performance will be introduced by Sarah Hamill, Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, who will situate it in the context of minimalist sculptures on view in the Ellen Johnson Gallery. The performance will begin at 6pm, and will last around 25 minutes.

Oberlin College student docents will also be on hand throughout the evening to answer questions and show visitors around the museum. Also available will be the AMAM’s audio tour and Family Self-Guides. Hope to see you Thursday!

Image:
Sol LeWitt (American, 1928 - 2007)
49 Three-Part Variations on Three Different Kinds of Cubes, 1967-71
Enamel on steel 
Fund for Contemporary Art, 1972
AMAM 1972.77 

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art art museum museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum first thursday sol lewitt 49 Three-Part Variations on Three Different Kinds of Cubes steve reich different trains

12 notes

amamblog:

When the Ellen Johnson Gallery reopens next week for the first time in over two years, one of the many works on view will be our Sol LeWitt ‘scribble drawing.’ “Wall Drawing #1222” was created by the artist specifically for the EJ gallery. It measures 23 by 18 feet and was executed entirely in pencil. It was first shown in the 2007 exhibition ‘Sol LeWitt at the AMAM,’ along with works on loan from the LeWitt Collection.

To make this drawing, eleven people worked the equivalent of 101 draftsman days to cover the wall’s 396 square feet with graphite. A total of 330 six-inch leads and twenty-eight woodless graphite pencil sticks were used.

It was first drawn by Takeshi Arita and Sachiko Cho from LeWitt’s studio, and Oberlin College students Alisa Doga, Julia Feldman, Harry Gassel, Catherine Janis, Grace Kiniako,  Sara Krugman, Hanna Siesel, Jeremy Wiles-Young, and museum staff member Michael Reynolds.

You can come out to see the ‘scribble drawing’ during our next ‘First Thursday’ evening hours - we’ll be open Thursday, October 6 until 8pm!

Did you know that there’s art in the Allen created by the hands of Obies? Sol LeWitt’s “Wall Drawing #1222” was executed by 11 students and staff members on the wall of the (soon to be reopened) Ellen Johnson Contemporary Art Gallery.

Filed under Allen Art Museum Oberlin College Sol Sol LeWitt art modern art wall drawing oberlin