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amamblog:

This Thursday and Friday, April 25 and 26, we will be hosting a very special symposium on Renaissance art in conjunction with our year-long exhibition “Religion, Ritual and Performance in the Renaissance” which presents important Renaissance paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts from the AMAM and the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG) collections. The symposium - free and open to the public - will be held in the museum’s King Sculpture Court, and will last from 11am to 6:30pm on April 25, and from 9am to 5pm on April 26.Presenters include Oberlin College faculty members from the Art, English, History and Musicology departments, three Oberlin College students who were selected via a competitive process, faculty from Case Western Reserve University, Washington & Lee University, Miami University of Ohio, and Ohio State University, along with staff from the AMAM, the YUAG, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Intermuseum Conservation Association. These two days promise to be exciting ones, and the public is warmly urged to attend. Presentations will range widely on topics related to medieval, Renaissance and baroque art, literature, history and music, as well as pilgrimage and religious practice.A complete schedule of speakers and events can be found on the symposium’s page here. If you are in town, we hope you can make it out to some of the talks!

amamblog:

This Thursday and Friday, April 25 and 26, we will be hosting a very special symposium on Renaissance art in conjunction with our year-long exhibition “Religion, Ritual and Performance in the Renaissance which presents important Renaissance paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts from the AMAM and the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG) collections. The symposium - free and open to the public - will be held in the museum’s King Sculpture Court, and will last from 11am to 6:30pm on April 25, and from 9am to 5pm on April 26.

Presenters include Oberlin College faculty members from the Art, English, History and Musicology departments, three Oberlin College students who were selected via a competitive process, faculty from Case Western Reserve University, Washington & Lee University, Miami University of Ohio, and Ohio State University, along with staff from the AMAM, the YUAG, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Intermuseum Conservation Association.

These two days promise to be exciting ones, and the public is warmly urged to attend. Presentations will range widely on topics related to medieval, Renaissance and baroque art, literature, history and music, as well as pilgrimage and religious practice.

A complete schedule of speakers and events can be found on the symposium’s page here

If you are in town, we hope you can make it out to some of the talks!

(via coffeewithclarence)

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amamblog:

Two new exhibitions open today at the AMAM exploring the theme of Religion, Ritual, and Performance.

Religion, Ritual and Performance in the Renaissance brings together more than 80 works, sacred and secular, spanning the late thirteenth to early seventeenth centuries, from both Northern and Southern Europe. The objects—which include paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts—are from the collections of the AMAM and Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition was made possible by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, as part of a collection-sharing initiative. It presents works used in private devotion, public worship, religious processions, and other rites and rituals, such as marriages, alongside those of a more secular nature, including portraits and chests, which nevertheless perform functions related to self-fashioning and display.

Also opening is Religion, Ritual, and Performance in Modern and Contemporary Art. As in earlier periods, the art of the 20th and 21st centuries engages in a dialogue with the important themes of religion, ritual, and performance. Works from the AMAM collection by artists from diverse backgrounds and artistic approaches reflect a broad array of responses to these concepts. 

Throughout the 2012-13 academic year, the AMAM will present other exhibitions, programs, and resources all exploring the central topic of Religion, Ritual, and Performance, including: four new exhibitions opening next week, our First Thursday evening hours, Tuesday Tea lecture series, and special gallery labels that connect eighteen works from the permanent collection to the year’s overarching theme.

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amamblog:

It’s already been a busy summer in the AMAM galleries, with several changes taking place in preparation for the big exhibition of the 2012-13 academic year, “Religion, Ritual, and Performance” which will incorporate over thirty Renaissance works from the Yale University Art Gallery with the AMAM’s Renaissance holdings.

As such, we are in the process of re-installing three of the gallery spaces, and the first one to be completed is the Nord Gallery. Over the past year, it was the home to our Renaissance collection, but is now featuring works of Modern art. It’s a good chance to revisit some old favorites in a new setting, and a new configuration.

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amamblog:

The practice of making copies after another artist’s work has longstanding roots. During the Renaissance, artists were encouraged to copy art from antiquity, as it was believed that imitating great art was the best way to learn. This convention of studying and venerating the masters remained a staple of academic training for centuries. Artists working in non-Western modes of art-making also have a long history of looking to the ancient masters. In emulating the work of their predecessors, artists from cultures such as China and Japan learned valuable lessons about traditional techniques and style.
In addition to its pedagogical function, copying also has practical purposes. Prior to the age of photo-mechanical reproduction, artists often made prints after their own or other art works for book illustration or other forms of dissemination.
Francesco Bartolozzi’s print, after Benjamin West’s allegorical murals in the Queen’s Lodge at Windsor, celebrates British advancements in the arts and sciences under King George III and glorifies the Enlightenment values of reason and knowledge. On the right, a woman peers through a Newtonian reflecting telescope at the H-shaped astronomical symbol for the planet Uranus, which British astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered in 1781 using a reflecting telescope he built himself. Image:Francesco Bartolozzi (Italian, 1727-1815) [after: Benjamin West, American, 1738-1820]The Genius of Light Awakens Science and Art, 1789 Engraving with etching Friends of Art Endowment Fund, 1982.96

amamblog:

The practice of making copies after another artist’s work has longstanding roots. During the Renaissance, artists were encouraged to copy art from antiquity, as it was believed that imitating great art was the best way to learn. This convention of studying and venerating the masters remained a staple of academic training for centuries. Artists working in non-Western modes of art-making also have a long history of looking to the ancient masters. In emulating the work of their predecessors, artists from cultures such as China and Japan learned valuable lessons about traditional techniques and style.

In addition to its pedagogical function, copying also has practical purposes. Prior to the age of photo-mechanical reproduction, artists often made prints after their own or other art works for book illustration or other forms of dissemination.

Francesco Bartolozzi’s print, after Benjamin West’s allegorical murals in the Queen’s Lodge at Windsor, celebrates British advancements in the arts and sciences under King George III and glorifies the Enlightenment values of reason and knowledge. On the right, a woman peers through a Newtonian reflecting telescope at the H-shaped astronomical symbol for the planet Uranus, which British astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered in 1781 using a reflecting telescope he built himself.

Image:
Francesco Bartolozzi (Italian, 1727-1815)
[after: Benjamin West, American, 1738-1820]
The Genius of Light Awakens Science and Art, 1789
Engraving with etching
Friends of Art Endowment Fund, 1982.96

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All of us have our own passions in academia and in music, and just one of our shared ones is Renaissance polyphony. And we come together for that.
Thatcher Lyman ‘04, a member of Uncloistered — a five-voice Renaissance musical ensemble comprised of Mary Larew ‘05, Naomi Morse ‘03, Sam Sytsma ‘03, Christopher Macklin ‘04, and Lyman — profiled in the Rochester City Paper.

Filed under oberlin Oberlin College oberlin conservatory Oberlin Conservatory of Music music performance renaissance polyphony voice vocal uncloistered alumni quote

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All of us have our own passions in academia and in music, and just one of our shared ones is Renaissance polyphony. And we come together for that.
Thatcher Lyman ‘04, a member of Uncloistered — a five-voice Renaissance musical ensemble comprised of Mary Larew ‘05, Naomi Morse ‘03, Sam Sytsma ‘03, Christopher Macklin ‘04, and Lyman — profiled in the Rochester City Paper.

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin conservatory Oberlin Conservatory of Music music performance renaissance polyphony voice vocal uncloistered alumni quote