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President Robert Carr and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Oberlin’s 1965 commencement exercises. Read Dr. King’s commencement address, Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

President Robert Carr and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Oberlin’s 1965 commencement exercises. Read Dr. King’s commencement address, Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

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Coffee with Clarence: The Arts at Oberlin: Bill Hood recalls his meeting with Martin Luther King

coffeewithclarence:

Bill Hood, a professor of Renaissance Art at Oberlin for 30 years, writes about his dinner with Martin Luther King:

Gradually the conversation moved to more serious topics, and Dr. King himself talked about the blight of poverty on our national life, as well as his feelings against the Vietnam…

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Let us stand up. Let us be a concerned generation. Let us remain awake through a great revolution. And we will speed up that great day when the American Dream will be a reality. We, in the final analysis, can gain consolation from the fact that at least we’ve made strides in our struggle for peace and in our struggle for justice. We still have a long, long way to go, but at least we’ve made a creative beginning.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in his 1965 Oberlin commencement address, “Remaining Awake Through A Great Revolution.”

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Dr. King hoped the Oberlin Commencement exercises had gone off well, and was very glad to have received ‘a little circular about the theological buildings,’ which he had shown to Mr. Crane, though he had not ‘taken up the matter with him at all’… King did not know when he would be back in Oberlin, but a few days in Constantinople would tell the story.

Harry N. Howard, The King-Crane Commission: An American Inquiry in the Middle East.

Henry Churchill King, of the King Building at Oberlin, was sent by Woodrow Wilson to document Middle Eastern opinion on what to do with with the areas that had until then been under the yolk of the Ottoman Empire. Also, did I mention that Oberlin has the entire original King-Crane Commission?

(via sarahstocracy)

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Your very favorite librarian: MLK Jr's Speech at Oberlin College (my Alma Mater)

yourveryfavoritelibrarian:

“Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution”

Commencement Address for Oberlin College

By Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

June 1965, Oberlin Ohio

“[Oberlin College] President Carr, members of the faculty, and members of the graduating class of this great institution of learning,…

We’ve been quoting it all day, and so have you! Nice!

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amamblog:

Today we honor the memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In this photo, taken by Ernest Withers, King is confronted at the funeral of Medgar Evers, a civil rights activist and World War II veteran assassinated in June 1963. Ernest Withers was an African-American photojournalist who was born and worked in Memphis. He documented the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s through the 1960s. His self-published pamphlet of photographs on the Emmit Till murder helped spur the equal rights movement.Withers described his first-hand involvement with the movement: “I’ve never been so scared in my life as I was in some of those places. You’d go into town with one of those big four-by-five press cameras…you couldn’t hide it anyplace. That camera was the first thing people would go for.”Withers forged a close personal relationship with King, Evers, and James Meredith. His visual records of events like the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and King’s assassination were often the first - and sometimes the only - photographs to document these events as they unfolded. Often this happened before the national press took up the stories. Withers reminds us that in the 1950s and early 1960s, the black papers were not part of the national wire services.Image:Ernest C. Withers (American, 1922–2007)Dr. Martin Luther King Is Confronted: Dr. King is stopped by police at Medgar Evers’ funeral, Jackson, Mississippi, June 1963From the portfolio I am a Man, 1963 Gelatin silver print Oberlin Friends of Art Fund AMAM 2004.6.6 

amamblog:

Today we honor the memory of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In this photo, taken by Ernest Withers, King is confronted at the funeral of Medgar Evers, a civil rights activist and World War II veteran assassinated in June 1963. 

Ernest Withers was an African-American photojournalist who was born and worked in Memphis. He documented the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s through the 1960s. His self-published pamphlet of photographs on the Emmit Till murder helped spur the equal rights movement.

Withers described his first-hand involvement with the movement: “I’ve never been so scared in my life as I was in some of those places. You’d go into town with one of those big four-by-five press cameras…you couldn’t hide it anyplace. That camera was the first thing people would go for.”

Withers forged a close personal relationship with King, Evers, and James Meredith. His visual records of events like the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and King’s assassination were often the first - and sometimes the only - photographs to document these events as they unfolded. Often this happened before the national press took up the stories. Withers reminds us that in the 1950s and early 1960s, the black papers were not part of the national wire services.


Image:
Ernest C. Withers (American, 1922–2007)
Dr. Martin Luther King Is Confronted: Dr. King is stopped by police at Medgar Evers’ funeral, Jackson, Mississippi, June 1963
From the portfolio I am a Man, 1963
Gelatin silver print
Oberlin Friends of Art Fund
AMAM 2004.6.6
 

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