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oberclassics:

We had another great day at Messene - a site with predominantly 4th century, Hellenistic, and Roman ruins. Things started out cold and cloudy, but we had breaks of sunshine as we explored the theater, stadium, Roman houses, tombs, etc. At the end of the day we drove to the little village of modern Olympia, where we’ve had a couple of nice days in the VERY quiet village. It’s low tourist season, and in the smaller villages we’re the only group in town.

-Kirk

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oberclassics:

Liz was going to post these photos, but she’s busy recovering from a catastrophic hard-drive crash. At the site of ancient Olympia, we ran a footrace at the stadium. That would be _the_ Olympic Stadium. We lined up on the starting line, in the position that seems to have been favored by the ancient Greeks (to judge from paintings on pottery where races are depicted). At the signal, we were off… a veritable herd of hard-running Obies. In the event, I took the silver; apparently only one student didn’t get the memo about letting me win. Omar made throwing the race look realistic by taking a dive in the mud right at the start. Sophia “stumbled” as well (though I don’t seem to have a picture of her after the event). True dedication.

-Kirk

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oberclassics:

A couple more group shots, as we continue our “Columns and wall-foundations tour.” The first is in front of the Castalian spring in Delphi; the second in front of the ruins of the temple of Apollo, where the most famous oracle in the ancient world was located. I asked the oracle if we would see cats at the Delphi museum. The response was unequivocal.

-Kirk

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oberclassics:

We saw Delphi, the main site, on Wednesday. There were plenty of rainbows, with Iris carrying messages across the sky. We saw a bunch of treasuries where the city-states would keep their offerings, the Temple of Apollo, the Sibyl Stone (remnants of an older cult), and a mega sphinx.

A pair of grad students (Greek, but studying Museum Studies in the Netherlands) had me fill out a survey about museums and the Delphi Museum. I learnt that they find the archaeological site and museum at Delphi one of the most important museums in Greece. — Rebecca

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