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Posts tagged artists on artists

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Kim Abeles’ ghostly images are formed by exposing partially masked Plexiglas plates to the atmospheric pollution of downtown Los Angeles for a specified length of time. The four stencils on view in the exhibition, Artists on Artists, recreate original works in the AMAM collection that depict variations of the American landscape. Two of Abeles’ recreations, along with images of the original works, are seen here.
 

Images:
Kim Abeles (American, b. 1952)
Margaret Bourke-White’s Smokestacks, Otis Steel Company (in 20 Days of Smog), 1994
Particulate matter (smog) on Plexiglas
Ruth Roush Fund for Contemporary Art, 1994.1.1
 

Margaret Bourke-White (American, 1904-1971)
Smokestacks, Otis Steel Company, 1928
Gelatin silver print
Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Photography Fund, 1991.21


Kim Abeles
(American, b. 1952)
Thomas Hart Benton’s Approaching Storm (in 20 Days of Smog), 1994
Stencil print
Ruth Roush Fund for Contemporary Art, 1994.1.4
 

Thomas Hart Benton (American, 1889-1975)
Approaching Storm (Noon), 1938
Lithograph
Gift of The Print Club of Cleveland, 1941.4

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While the artist is commonly present in depictions of performance art, this presence is not intended as an exploration of the self as in self-portraiture. Instead, the artist’s body serves as a catalyst for ephemeral actions, preserved only through documents and photographs. Vito Acconci captures the use of his own body as an art-making implement in Kiss Off. For this work, Acconci transferred red lipstick from his own mouth to various parts of his body, which he then pressed onto a printing stone to be transmitted to paper. The artist is thus present not only in the photographic documentation of the act, but in his body’s literal inscription in the final work.On view through July 29 in the exhibition Artists on Artists. Image:Vito Acconci (American, b. 1940)Kiss Off, 1971Lithograph Art Rental Collection Fund, RC1971.5 

amamblog:

While the artist is commonly present in depictions of performance art, this presence is not intended as an exploration of the self as in self-portraiture. Instead, the artist’s body serves as a catalyst for ephemeral actions, preserved only through documents and photographs. Vito Acconci captures the use of his own body as an art-making implement in Kiss Off. For this work, Acconci transferred red lipstick from his own mouth to various parts of his body, which he then pressed onto a printing stone to be transmitted to paper. The artist is thus present not only in the photographic documentation of the act, but in his body’s literal inscription in the final work.

On view through July 29 in the exhibition Artists on Artists

Image:
Vito Acconci (American, b. 1940)
Kiss Off, 1971
Lithograph
Art Rental Collection Fund, RC1971.5 

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Marc Chagall was introduced to printmaking in Berlin in 1922, at the age of thirty-five. The autobiographical portfolio My Life marked the artist’s first serious foray into printmaking, and he completed this suite of etchings within three weeks. My Life drew on Chagall’s vivid memories of his childhood in the Russian village of Vitebsk, and included images of the artist, his family, his childhood home, and his neighbors. In this self-portrait, Chagall presents himself as literally comprised of these elements of family—represented by his wife, child, and parents making up his torso—and home—symbolized by the house balancing atop his head.Artists have long turned to their own image as a subject. A means of self-exploration, self-portraiture allows artists to portray themselves according to their own wishes, sometimes focusing on their exterior likeness or on their inner personality. Self-portraits provide for more experimentation than portraits of others, since the artist has no external client to please. Many self-portraits are created as a form of self-promotion, intended to demonstrate the artist’s status and skill.From the exhibition, Artists on Artists, on view through July 29.Image:
Marc Chagall (French, born in Russia, 1887–1985)Self-Portrait, no. 17 from the series Mein Leben, 1922 EtchingGift of Hazel B. King,  1951.32  

amamblog:

Marc Chagall was introduced to printmaking in Berlin in 1922, at the age of thirty-five. The autobiographical portfolio My Life marked the artist’s first serious foray into printmaking, and he completed this suite of etchings within three weeks. My Life drew on Chagall’s vivid memories of his childhood in the Russian village of Vitebsk, and included images of the artist, his family, his childhood home, and his neighbors. In this self-portrait, Chagall presents himself as literally comprised of these elements of family—represented by his wife, child, and parents making up his torso—and home—symbolized by the house balancing atop his head.

Artists have long turned to their own image as a subject. A means of self-exploration, self-portraiture allows artists to portray themselves according to their own wishes, sometimes focusing on their exterior likeness or on their inner personality. Self-portraits provide for more experimentation than portraits of others, since the artist has no external client to please. Many self-portraits are created as a form of self-promotion, intended to demonstrate the artist’s status and skill.

From the exhibition, Artists on Artists, on view through July 29.

Image:

Marc Chagall (French, born in Russia, 1887–1985)
Self-Portrait, no. 17 from the series Mein Leben, 1922
Etching
Gift of Hazel B. King,  1951.32  

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In this playful image, mail artist Ray Johnson wittily presents abstract painters Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) and Agnes Martin (1912-2004) as a pair of fried eggs. Johnson creates a pun on each artist’s name to emphasize their rhyming qualities, changing “Reinhardt” to “Reinheart,” and “Martin” to “Heartin.”The exhibition Artists on Artists remains on view through July 29.Image:Ray Johnson (American, 1927-1995)Ad Reinheart and Agnes Heartin, 1970sCommercially-printed card with felt-tip pen Ellen H. Johnson Bequest, 1998.7.55 

amamblog:

In this playful image, mail artist Ray Johnson wittily presents abstract painters Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) and Agnes Martin (1912-2004) as a pair of fried eggs. Johnson creates a pun on each artist’s name to emphasize their rhyming qualities, changing “Reinhardt” to “Reinheart,” and “Martin” to “Heartin.”

The exhibition Artists on Artists remains on view through July 29.

Image:
Ray Johnson (American, 1927-1995)
Ad Reinheart and Agnes Heartin, 1970s
Commercially-printed card with felt-tip pen
Ellen H. Johnson Bequest, 1998.7.55 

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Born in Washington, Lee Friedlander studied photography in Los Angeles, and initially earned recognition for his portraits of New Orleans jazz musicians. During the 1960s, he rediscovered the work of E.J. Bellocq, an early 20th-century New Orleans photographer, and collaborated with artist Jim Dine to produce a book of photographs and etchings, Work from the Same House (1969). Throughout his career, Friedlander has shown continual interest in the changing aspects of American culture, and his projects serve as documentation of these changes. Of his favorite subjects are portraits of his family and friends; several of these images were published in Lee Friedlander Portraits (1985).On view in the exhibition, Artists on Artists, through July 29.Image:
Lee Friedlander (American, b. 1934)Jim Dine, London, 1969Gelatin silver printGift of John Coplans, 1992.4.1 

amamblog:

Born in Washington, Lee Friedlander studied photography in Los Angeles, and initially earned recognition for his portraits of New Orleans jazz musicians. During the 1960s, he rediscovered the work of E.J. Bellocq, an early 20th-century New Orleans photographer, and collaborated with artist Jim Dine to produce a book of photographs and etchings, Work from the Same House (1969). Throughout his career, Friedlander has shown continual interest in the changing aspects of American culture, and his projects serve as documentation of these changes. Of his favorite subjects are portraits of his family and friends; several of these images were published in Lee Friedlander Portraits (1985).

On view in the exhibition, Artists on Artists, through July 29.

Image:

Lee Friedlander (American, b. 1934)
Jim Dine, London, 1969
Gelatin silver print
Gift of John Coplans, 1992.4.1 

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This photograph of French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) was one of 33 photogravures included in Alvin Langdon Coburn’s book Men of Mark, published in 1913. In addition to Rodin, Coburn’s book featured portraits of such well-known artists, writers, and statesmen as Henri Matisse, Henry James, and Theodore Roosevelt. Photographed from a slightly lower vantage point and positioned tight within the edges of the frame, Rodin’s imposing visage and billowing beard dominates the composition. The photogravure’s soft focus and grainy texture indicate Coburn’s interest in Pictorialist devices, which aimed to replicate the appearance of the painted surface in photography.
The exhibition Artists on Artists continues through July 29.Image:Alvin Langdon Coburn (American, 1882-1966)Auguste Rodin, Meudon, pl. IX from Men of Mark, 1906-13PhotogravureCharles F. Olney Fund, 1977.67

amamblog:

This photograph of French sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) was one of 33 photogravures included in Alvin Langdon Coburn’s book Men of Mark, published in 1913. In addition to Rodin, Coburn’s book featured portraits of such well-known artists, writers, and statesmen as Henri Matisse, Henry James, and Theodore Roosevelt. Photographed from a slightly lower vantage point and positioned tight within the edges of the frame, Rodin’s imposing visage and billowing beard dominates the composition. The photogravure’s soft focus and grainy texture indicate Coburn’s interest in Pictorialist devices, which aimed to replicate the appearance of the painted surface in photography.

The exhibition Artists on Artists continues through July 29.

Image:
Alvin Langdon Coburn (American, 1882-1966)
Auguste Rodin, Meudon, pl. IX from Men of Mark, 1906-13
Photogravure
Charles F. Olney Fund, 1977.67

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Honoré Daumier was a prolific draftsman, printmaker, and caricaturist, whose works satirized political and social life in France in the 19th century. This caricature of Parisian photographer Félix Nadar (born Gaspard-Félix Tournachon) appeared in Le Boulevard on May 25, 1862. Daumier’s composition presents Nadar aloft in his self-designed hot air balloon nicknamed Le Géant (“The Giant”), from which he made the world’s first aerial photographs. Daumier’s characteristic wit is conveyed in the detail of Nadar’s hat, which escapes unnoticed in the excitement and intensity of the photographer’s concentration. Daumier’s caption, “Nadar, raising Photography to the height of Art,” is also a clever pun, alluding both to Nadar’s literal elevation above the city of Paris, and to the prevalent debate in the 19th century about whether photography could be considered a fine art.Now on view in the exhibition, Artists on Artists. Image:Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879)Nadar, elevant la Photographie a la hauteur de l’Art, 1862Lithograph R.T. Miller, Jr. Fund, 1995.4 

amamblog:

Honoré Daumier was a prolific draftsman, printmaker, and caricaturist, whose works satirized political and social life in France in the 19th century. This caricature of Parisian photographer Félix Nadar (born Gaspard-Félix Tournachon) appeared in Le Boulevard on May 25, 1862. Daumier’s composition presents Nadar aloft in his self-designed hot air balloon nicknamed Le Géant (“The Giant”), from which he made the world’s first aerial photographs. Daumier’s characteristic wit is conveyed in the detail of Nadar’s hat, which escapes unnoticed in the excitement and intensity of the photographer’s concentration. Daumier’s caption, “Nadar, raising Photography to the height of Art,” is also a clever pun, alluding both to Nadar’s literal elevation above the city of Paris, and to the prevalent debate in the 19th century about whether photography could be considered a fine art.

Now on view in the exhibition, Artists on Artists

Image:
Honoré Daumier (French, 1808-1879)
Nadar, elevant la Photographie a la hauteur de l’Art, 1862
Lithograph
R.T. Miller, Jr. Fund, 1995.4 

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For nearly as long as artists have been making art, they have also appeared as its subject. One current exhibition at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Artists on Artists, comprised of works from the AMAM’s collection spanning the 16th-21st centuries, considers the theme of the artist as portrayed by the artist. The exhibition is on view in our second floor Ripin Print Gallery, and will be displayed through July 29.

The exhibition begins with portraits. Pictured by their colleagues, artists are presented as mentors, comrades, and objects of veneration. Some images highlight the sitter’s personality, while others muse on his status as an artist, often shown at work amongst the tools of his trade.

Red Grooms’s characteristic absurd humor is featured prominently in his series Nineteenth-Century Artists. In these imaginary portraits, Grooms presents some of the most respected artists of the previous century—such as Paul Cézanne and James Abbott McNeill Whistle—as depraved caricatures. Above, we see sculptor Auguste Rodin prancing around his studio in women’s clothing. Grooms employs a wide variety of printing techniques—including etching, drypoint, and aquatint—to achieve diverse effects of line and tone. Nine works from this series are on view.


Images:

Red Grooms (American, b. 1937)
Nineteenth-Century Artists series (Whistler, Rodin, Cézanne), 1976
Etching, aquatint, and drypoint
Special Acquisitions Fund (through friends of John N. Stern in honor of his birthday)
AMAM 1978.3.1-10 

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Two new works have been installed in the AMAM’s exhibition Artists on Artists on view in our Ripin Print Gallery. Jim Dine’s Charcoal Self-Portrait in a Cement Garden (right) is an example of the Dine’s series of compositions that employ the trope of the empty bathrobe as a stand-in for the artist’s absent body. On the left, Sir Jacob Epstein’s bust is a penetrating portrait of recently-deceased British painter Lucian Freud, the grandson of founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud.

Artists on Artists will be on view though July 29. 

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Have any plans for this Thursday? No? Then come help the Allen Memorial Art Museum celebrate the openings of three new spring exhibitions! For this special event, the museum galleries will remain open until 8pm. Also offered will be food (from Pink Peppercorn Catering) and tours of the new exhibitions by Denise Birkhofer, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at 5:30pm and Liliana Milkova, Curator of Academic Programs at 6pm. This semester’s exhibitions include: “Artists on Artists” - Organized by Denise Birkhofer, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art; “Italy on Paper” - Co-curated by Liliana Milkova, Curator of Academic Programs, and Stiliana Milkova, with assistance from Sara Green (OC ‘12). Additional research conducted by Hanna Exel (OC ‘12) and Thomas Huston (OC ‘13); and “Ephemeral Installations and the Aesthetics of Nature” - Organized by Janet Fiskio, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies. All exhibitions will be on view through July 2012. 

amamblog:

Have any plans for this Thursday? No? Then come help the Allen Memorial Art Museum celebrate the openings of three new spring exhibitions! For this special event, the museum galleries will remain open until 8pm. Also offered will be food (from Pink Peppercorn Catering) and tours of the new exhibitions by Denise Birkhofer, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at 5:30pm and Liliana Milkova, Curator of Academic Programs at 6pm.

This semester’s exhibitions include: “Artists on Artists” - Organized by Denise Birkhofer, Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art; “Italy on Paper” - Co-curated by Liliana Milkova, Curator of Academic Programs, and Stiliana Milkova, with assistance from Sara Green (OC ‘12). Additional research conducted by Hanna Exel (OC ‘12) and Thomas Huston (OC ‘13); and “Ephemeral Installations and the Aesthetics of Nature” - Organized by Janet Fiskio, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies. All exhibitions will be on view through July 2012.
 

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