Oberlin College

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Posts tagged art show

266 notes

dalerothenberg:

yesterday’s show at oberlin’s frank lloyd wright house was incredible! we had a big turnout and had a great time. I’m still amazed at how many people showed up.

I’ve been working on this continuously for a straight week…it’s a wonderful feeling to see hard work pay off. I’m relatively satisfied with the selection and it’s a relief to finally be done. this next week I’m just doing some video projects and small editorial stuff, and then graduating. weird feeling.

(via amamblog)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art photography frank lloyd wright frank lloyd wright house Weltzheimer/Johnson House art show

1 note

coffeewithclarence:

Hi Everyone !
I’d like to invite you to my studio this Friday 17th between 5:30pm and 7pm. Please come by whenever you can before Art Walk. I will be showing work made this year with assistance from the Grant in Aid program at Oberlin College. My studio is in an industrial looking building near the intersection of E. Lorain St and Park St. 
Best
Graham

   Open Studio   

   Friday 17th   

   5:30 - 7pm  

   162 E Lorain St, Oberlin, OH  

coffeewithclarence:

Hi Everyone !

I’d like to invite you to my studio this Friday 17th between 5:30pm and 7pm. Please come by whenever you can before Art Walk. I will be showing work made this year with assistance from the Grant in Aid program at Oberlin College. My studio is in an industrial looking building near the intersection of E. Lorain St and Park St. 
Best
Graham
   Open Studio   
   Friday 17th   
   5:30 - 7pm  

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art art show art library studio

5 notes

oberlincollegearchivesstudents:

            Hi, I’m Gregory Wikstrom. I have been the Webmaster of the Archives for a little over a year now. My job doesn’t only involve our website; I assist however else I am needed. Usually this means I get to carry around heavy boxes and put them in inconveniently high places. But I also see the inner workings of daily life at the Archives, and get to help finding information and processing collections. I am a Studio Art major and a senior. I like photography, film and music.                         
            This past weekend my senior thesis show, “The Collection” opened in Fisher Gallery. We built an 8-foot wall to divide the gallery into two spaces. In the first space you entered, we had created “The Office of the Collection,” a research organization of ambiguous mission and nature.  There was no limit to the sorts of things they seemed to be researching; on one table was a taken apart sewing machine, each individual piece labeled meticulously. On another table there lay fifteen photographs from the cell phone of a Chinese gangster, a tattooed man in various exotic places, grinning with stacks of yuan. The Office of the Collection represents the presence of surveillance and the collection of our information in our daily lives.
            As we designed the space, I couldn’t help but noticing the ways in which I was inspired by my work at the Archives. We had filled the space to the brim with collections of papers and photos and broken electronics, and couldn’t figure out how to install it all to be distinct within the space. I wanted the collections to look like research experiments; I wanted each one to look important. I began to think about the collections at the Archives, the fundamental common denominators between all of the different types of stuff. I thought of one afternoon I spent at the Archives putting fifty-or-so ancient Chinese coins into individual bags. I thought of the aesthetic transformation that had occurred with the objects over the day. At first, there was a box filled with irregular metal objects, scraping and clanking against one another, an archivist’s nightmare.  When I had finished, there was no longer any irregularity, only tiny Ziplocs silently sliding around in a manila folder, and a guide to their significances in a taupe box. I realized: I had processed that collection. In order to look significant, my objects needed to look processed.
            And so I applied that aesthetic as I directed the installation of the space. I numbered and labeled everything I could. I created literature to accompany the objects in the form of lists and diagrams. It didn’t matter to me whether or not the viewer could decipher what was being cataloged and why. It just needed to look, in a way, almost like the Archives. The office needed to seem to be confronted with a wealth of raw material in different media, and determining how they would manage it all.
            Towards the end of the installation, I added a finishing touch to imply a temporality, or evidence that “The Collection” had been going on for a while. I recycled some of the Archives’ old boxes that had lost their acid-free value, relabeled them to say “The Office of the Collection,” and built a shelf for them. While this one shelf paled in comparison to the ranges in the back of the Archives, I hope the stately, metal-edge boxes suggested the power of collection. Archivists, investigators, security personnel, and all collectors assume a role that requires them to step outside of reality in order to observe and preserve it. By assuming that role and working or existing in that space, they dictate how we are understood and how we are remembered. For us, the subjects, that knowledge is indispensible.

Art show + archives = awesome.

oberlincollegearchivesstudents:

            Hi, I’m Gregory Wikstrom. I have been the Webmaster of the Archives for a little over a year now. My job doesn’t only involve our website; I assist however else I am needed. Usually this means I get to carry around heavy boxes and put them in inconveniently high places. But I also see the inner workings of daily life at the Archives, and get to help finding information and processing collections. I am a Studio Art major and a senior. I like photography, film and music.                        

            This past weekend my senior thesis show, “The Collection” opened in Fisher Gallery. We built an 8-foot wall to divide the gallery into two spaces. In the first space you entered, we had created “The Office of the Collection,” a research organization of ambiguous mission and nature.  There was no limit to the sorts of things they seemed to be researching; on one table was a taken apart sewing machine, each individual piece labeled meticulously. On another table there lay fifteen photographs from the cell phone of a Chinese gangster, a tattooed man in various exotic places, grinning with stacks of yuan. The Office of the Collection represents the presence of surveillance and the collection of our information in our daily lives.

            As we designed the space, I couldn’t help but noticing the ways in which I was inspired by my work at the Archives. We had filled the space to the brim with collections of papers and photos and broken electronics, and couldn’t figure out how to install it all to be distinct within the space. I wanted the collections to look like research experiments; I wanted each one to look important. I began to think about the collections at the Archives, the fundamental common denominators between all of the different types of stuff. I thought of one afternoon I spent at the Archives putting fifty-or-so ancient Chinese coins into individual bags. I thought of the aesthetic transformation that had occurred with the objects over the day. At first, there was a box filled with irregular metal objects, scraping and clanking against one another, an archivist’s nightmare.  When I had finished, there was no longer any irregularity, only tiny Ziplocs silently sliding around in a manila folder, and a guide to their significances in a taupe box. I realized: I had processed that collection. In order to look significant, my objects needed to look processed.

            And so I applied that aesthetic as I directed the installation of the space. I numbered and labeled everything I could. I created literature to accompany the objects in the form of lists and diagrams. It didn’t matter to me whether or not the viewer could decipher what was being cataloged and why. It just needed to look, in a way, almost like the Archives. The office needed to seem to be confronted with a wealth of raw material in different media, and determining how they would manage it all.

            Towards the end of the installation, I added a finishing touch to imply a temporality, or evidence that “The Collection” had been going on for a while. I recycled some of the Archives’ old boxes that had lost their acid-free value, relabeled them to say “The Office of the Collection,” and built a shelf for them. While this one shelf paled in comparison to the ranges in the back of the Archives, I hope the stately, metal-edge boxes suggested the power of collection. Archivists, investigators, security personnel, and all collectors assume a role that requires them to step outside of reality in order to observe and preserve it. By assuming that role and working or existing in that space, they dictate how we are understood and how we are remembered. For us, the subjects, that knowledge is indispensible.

Art show + archives = awesome.

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin college archives archives art the collection studio art art show

6 notes

coffeewithclarence:

Check This Out! Oberlin College and Gordon Square Arts District have just announced their Regional Artistic Collaboration, an effort to raise the profile of GSAD as a regional artistic centre, and to create a regional stage for Oberlin students to showcase their talent. Read more by clicking the image, and get excited!

The opening gala is this weekend, featuring TONS of student art in the exhibition.

coffeewithclarence:

Check This Out! Oberlin College and Gordon Square Arts District have just announced their Regional Artistic Collaboration, an effort to raise the profile of GSAD as a regional artistic centre, and to create a regional stage for Oberlin students to showcase their talent. Read more by clicking the image, and get excited!

The opening gala is this weekend, featuring TONS of student art in the exhibition.

Filed under Gordon Square Gordon Square Arts District GSAD Oberlin Oberlin College art art show exhibition student work