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oberlincollegearchivesstudents:

Perhaps the most visually stimulating record of student life on campus is our poster collection. These student-made posters tell us a lot – they give us not only an idea of past events on campus, some of which would otherwise go undocumented, but they reveal the culture and visual aesthetic of Oberlin students at a given point in time.

Our most recent accession, a collection of 34 silkscreened event posters gifted by Raphael Martin ‘02, does exactly that.  During his four years at Oberlin, from 1998 to 2002, Martin collected these posters, most of which were silkscreened by students of Prof. John Pearson. They present a wide range of visual styles and advertise dances, concerts, art openings, parties, film screenings, speakers, and Oberlin’s Big Parade. Only a few duplicate posters already in our collections; together they represent an important cross-section of posters from the turn of the millennium.

I think the “Scotographs” poster is a particularly cool one. The word itself, popping against the blue, leads my eye back in space towards the guitar, which seems to be exploding riffs outwards through the stripes. The whole poster has a loud, screaming sound to it, and if I saw this poster today hanging in the Mudd stairwell today, I’d definitely go check these photos out.

-James

(top photo courtesy of Raphael Martin ‘02)

(via oberlin-alumni)

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oberlincollegearchivesstudents:

If you haven’t had a chance yet to come see our “Out of the Box” exhibit, there’s still time! This exhibit is our first to take place in the newly renovated Goodrich Room on the 4th floor of Mudd Library. We’re highlighting some of the cool (and sometimes weird) objects in our collection, like the hats and clubs pictured above. The clubs, especially, are an interesting story. We only had minimal documentation on them until Emeritus Professor of Chemistry Norman Craig stopped by to see the exhibit and, recognizing the clubs, decided to share some of his knowledge with us.
Though we typically think of these as juggling clubs, these are actually what are known as Indian clubs, popular exercise tools in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that were used in a variety of swinging routines. In India, larger versions of clubs like these were used by wrestlers to develop strength. The practice was taken up by the British in the Victorian era and then popularized in the U.S.  These specific clubs were owned by Fred E. Leonard, a professor of Physical Education at Oberlin from 1888-1922. Werner Bromund, a professor Chemistry from 1937-75, was a Big Ten champion in the Indian clubs routine as a student at the University of Chicago. Bromund would frequently demonstrate his skills with the clubs during Illumination at Oberlin.
If you have a minute, stop by the Archives and check them out!

Oh wow. Sounds like a trip to Archives might be in order!

oberlincollegearchivesstudents:

If you haven’t had a chance yet to come see our “Out of the Box” exhibit, there’s still time! This exhibit is our first to take place in the newly renovated Goodrich Room on the 4th floor of Mudd Library. We’re highlighting some of the cool (and sometimes weird) objects in our collection, like the hats and clubs pictured above. The clubs, especially, are an interesting story. We only had minimal documentation on them until Emeritus Professor of Chemistry Norman Craig stopped by to see the exhibit and, recognizing the clubs, decided to share some of his knowledge with us.


Though we typically think of these as juggling clubs, these are actually what are known as Indian clubs, popular exercise tools in the late 19th and early 20th centuries that were used in a variety of swinging routines. In India, larger versions of clubs like these were used by wrestlers to develop strength. The practice was taken up by the British in the Victorian era and then popularized in the U.S.  These specific clubs were owned by Fred E. Leonard, a professor of Physical Education at Oberlin from 1888-1922. Werner Bromund, a professor Chemistry from 1937-75, was a Big Ten champion in the Indian clubs routine as a student at the University of Chicago. Bromund would frequently demonstrate his skills with the clubs during Illumination at Oberlin.

If you have a minute, stop by the Archives and check them out!

Oh wow. Sounds like a trip to Archives might be in order!

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin college archives archives objects juggling clubs Indian clubs Out of the Box exhibition

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jgrahamcrackers:

On account of Co-Educations:
HE.The night is passing fair, my love,Too fair to stay at home.The night is passing fair, my love,Let us together roam.We’ll walk and talk together, love,Of things not in the books,Out of the vulgar sight of manIn many shady nooks.
SHE.The night indeed is fairThe very night to roam,But on mature reflectionI think I’ll stay at home.No fault I find with the night, love,And shady nooks and suck,But I have a class at nine, love,And will have to study Dutch.
[from The Oberlin Review, 1890] 

jgrahamcrackers:

On account of Co-Educations:

HE.
The night is passing fair, my love,
Too fair to stay at home.
The night is passing fair, my love,
Let us together roam.
We’ll walk and talk together, love,
Of things not in the books,
Out of the vulgar sight of man
In many shady nooks.

SHE.
The night indeed is fair
The very night to roam,
But on mature reflection
I think I’ll stay at home.
No fault I find with the night, love,
And shady nooks and suck,
But I have a class at nine, love,
And will have to study Dutch.

[from The Oberlin Review, 1890] 

(Source: little-grey-teacup)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin history oberlin review history archives co-ed co-education

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Perhaps the most significant thing that can be said about women in this society is that we are relegated to the private world and not expected to enter the public sphere. We can look at careers in terms of being secretaries, maids, or whores. As a group, we are brainwashed to believe that we are physically and mentally inferior to men, and this feeling has led to our being passive women who do not feel qualified to assert ourselves as people, only as objects.
“The Woman Question,” Oberlin Review, May 8, 1970 (via oberlinactivisthistory)

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2 notes

The fact that housing and dining can make an arbitrary determination to discontinue the women’s collective is offensive in terms of a seeming attempt by the administration to inhibit the development of the women’s movement at a time when affirmative action and declared institutional support require a responsive and even encouraging attitude.
Letter to the Editor from faculty member Brenda Way, Oberlin Review, January 25, 1974 (via oberlinactivisthistory)

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I have no doubt that Thurston would be a suitable home for a variety of different groups of people. It is, however, my overwhelming feeling that it is already someone’s home. The Collective is not a dorm for women. It is a house which women have cared enough about to make it a home in the fullest sense of the word. Our belongings are the house’s furnishings. We ourselves are a family. I consider the discontinuation of the women’s collective to be a dangerously damaging blow to women; I see the designation of Thurston to upperclass men a puzzling slap in the face.

“Why a Women’s Collective?” Oberlin Review, January 25, 1974

(via oberlinactivisthistory)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin college archives college archives archives oberlin history women's collective oberlin review