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Posts tagged Allen Memorial Art Museum

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Jazz bassist Milt Hinton’s photographs serve as valuable records of the jazz world from the perspective of one of its most celebrated insiders. A selection of his photographs will be on display in the Allen Memorial Art Museum (amamblog) through December 2014. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

Jazz bassist Milt Hinton’s photographs serve as valuable records of the jazz world from the perspective of one of its most celebrated insiders. A selection of his photographs will be on display in the Allen Memorial Art Museum (amamblog) through December 2014. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlin conservatory oberlin conservatory of music music performance jazz bass jazz bass photography milt hinton amam allen memorial art museum allen art museum art museum history oberlin.edu

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Today on oberlin.edu, we’re featuring the docents at the Allen Memorial Art Museum. Students are trained in an annual winter term course entitled Practicum in Museum Education and dedicate time after the course leading gallery tours for the Oberlin community. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

Today on oberlin.edu, we’re featuring the docents at the Allen Memorial Art Museum. Students are trained in an annual winter term course entitled Practicum in Museum Education and dedicate time after the course leading gallery tours for the Oberlin community. (via Oberlin College & Conservatory)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college allen memorial art museum docent student docent docent training program education arts education AMAM art museum art museum allen art museum oberlin.edu college art museum

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amamblog:

Now you see it…: Immediately following Commencement/Reunion Weekend, the exhibition Religion, Ritual and Performance in Modern and Contemporary Art closed and we began preparing the gallery for next year’s show Modern and Contemporary Realisms. Our wonderful “scribble” drawing by Sol LeWitt has now been covered over by a temporary wall in preparation for that installation.The wall drawing was created by LeWitt specifically for the museum’s Ellen Johnson Gallery as part of a 2007 exhibition, Sol LeWitt at the AMAM, which featured other works by LeWitt from the AMAM collection, along with loans from the LeWitt Collection. When LeWitt died at the age of seventy-eight, shortly after the exhibition opened, it became a memorial to the artist and his legacy. The “scribble” drawing, which measures twenty-two feet high, was a gift from the artist and among the very last of his wall drawings. LeWitt gave instructions to teams of people - in Oberlin’s case, members of his studio, Oberlin students, community members, and students from other colleges - for such drawings, which took weeks to execute, always giving the teams “wiggle room” and insisting that their input made a vital contribution to the final artwork.
To see images from the original installation and read more about how it was created, you can visit an earlier blog post here.
Image:Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)Wall Drawing #1222 (Scribbles: Curved Horizontal Bands), 2007Black graphite pencil Gift of the Artist, AMAM 2007.5

amamblog:

Now you see it…: Immediately following Commencement/Reunion Weekend, the exhibition Religion, Ritual and Performance in Modern and Contemporary Art closed and we began preparing the gallery for next year’s show Modern and Contemporary RealismsOur wonderful “scribble” drawing by Sol LeWitt has now been covered over by a temporary wall in preparation for that installation.

The wall drawing was created by LeWitt specifically for the museum’s Ellen Johnson Gallery as part of a 2007 exhibition, Sol LeWitt at the AMAM, which featured other works by LeWitt from the AMAM collection, along with loans from the LeWitt Collection. When LeWitt died at the age of seventy-eight, shortly after the exhibition opened, it became a memorial to the artist and his legacy. The “scribble” drawing, which measures twenty-two feet high, was a gift from the artist and among the very last of his wall drawings. LeWitt gave instructions to teams of people - in Oberlin’s case, members of his studio, Oberlin students, community members, and students from other colleges - for such drawings, which took weeks to execute, always giving the teams “wiggle room” and insisting that their input made a vital contribution to the final artwork.

To see images from the original installation and read more about how it was created, you can visit an earlier blog post here.

Image:
Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)
Wall Drawing #1222 (Scribbles: Curved Horizontal Bands), 2007
Black graphite pencil 
Gift of the Artist, AMAM 2007.5

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art museum art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum sol lewitt installation

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amamblog:

AMAM Year in Review: This small group of photos showcases the variety of public programs offered at the Allen Memorial Art Museum during the 2012-13 academic year. From First Thursday events for students and the public, to a scholarly symposium on the Renaissance, and community day events for kids and the family, it was a very academic year. 

While some of our galleries will close to be re-installed over the summer, we will still be offering public programs, such as youth camps, regular Frank Lloyd Wright open houses, and the eighth annual Oberlin Chalk Walk!! Stay tuned!

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art museum art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum year in review

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themuseumjunkie:

Rani Molla (Oberlin College, Class of 2008) writes about the about the Tate Modern’s #TateTour twitter tour of their Lichtenstein show - and starts with her memories of Art Rental. 
Image: Lichtenstein, Boot on Hand, 1964. Art Rental Collection at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin, OH. 
To learn more about Art Rental at Oberlin ($5 per work/semester!), visit the AMAM website…
Or read Nicole Gutman’s (Oberlin College, Class of 2016) first-hand account of renting art: Oberlin Review

themuseumjunkie:

Rani Molla (Oberlin College, Class of 2008) writes about the about the Tate Modern’s #TateTour twitter tour of their Lichtenstein show - and starts with her memories of Art Rental. 

Image: Lichtenstein, Boot on Hand, 1964. Art Rental Collection at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin, OH. 

To learn more about Art Rental at Oberlin ($5 per work/semester!), visit the AMAM website

Or read Nicole Gutman’s (Oberlin College, Class of 2016) first-hand account of renting art: Oberlin Review

(Source: artbaselspacecamp, via oberlin-alumni)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art museum art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum art rental tate modern roy lichtenstein oberlin alumni alumni

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amamblog:


Although books of hours were the most common devotional books of the fifteenth century, there were also more varied collections of prayer. This leaf comes from one such prayer book. It shows the hand of the resurrected Christ, whose palm bears the stigmata associated with his crucifixion. Set against a yellow background meant to imitate gold leaf, this inexpensive image was used by readers who looked at the image while contemplating Christ’s death and subsequent resurrection. The text encircling the image translates as, “Whatever has been, or will be, appointed through the right hand of God the omnipotent father shall be blessed.”
This image is one of only two printed works in the exhibition Private Prayer, Public Performance. A woodcut, it was made around 1450, roughly contemporary with Gutenberg’s invention of printing with movable type, which would spell the end of manuscript illumination. This work illustrates that transition perfectly: although the image is printed, the prayer on the other side of the page is handwritten.This work will be on view in the 2nd floor Ripin Print Gallery through July 31 in the exhibition Private Prayer, Public Performance: Religious Books of the Later Middle Ages and Renaissance.
Image:GermanHand of God, Leaf from a Prayerbook, ca. 1450Hand-colored woodcutFriends of Art Fund, 1956.2

amamblog:

Although books of hours were the most common devotional books of the fifteenth century, there were also more varied collections of prayer. This leaf comes from one such prayer book. It shows the hand of the resurrected Christ, whose palm bears the stigmata associated with his crucifixion. Set against a yellow background meant to imitate gold leaf, this inexpensive image was used by readers who looked at the image while contemplating Christ’s death and subsequent resurrection. The text encircling the image translates as, “Whatever has been, or will be, appointed through the right hand of God the omnipotent father shall be blessed.”

This image is one of only two printed works in the exhibition Private Prayer, Public Performance. A woodcut, it was made around 1450, roughly contemporary with Gutenberg’s invention of printing with movable type, which would spell the end of manuscript illumination. This work illustrates that transition perfectly: although the image is printed, the prayer on the other side of the page is handwritten.

This work will be on view in the 2nd floor Ripin Print Gallery through July 31 in the exhibition Private Prayer, Public Performance: Religious Books of the Later Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Image:
German
Hand of God, Leaf from a Prayerbook, ca. 1450
Hand-colored woodcut
Friends of Art Fund, 1956.2

Filed under oberlin oberlin college art museum art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum private prayer public performance print

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oberlinconservatory:

themuseumjunkie:

OBERLINIA || The Oberlin College administration, faculty, and staff’s tribute video to the Class of 2013 (!!!), who will be graduating on Monday. These are screenshots from the video that show Prof. Erik Inglis (‘89) describing an “object” in the collection of Oberlin’s Allen Memorial Art Museum (AMAM). This parody work of art is the poster for the failed “Fearless” publicity campaign of 2006, so it’s good to know that the administration isn’t taking itself too seriously || LEARNING & LABOR

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

STILL can’t get enough of this video!

(Source: artbaselspacecamp)

Filed under oberlin oberlin college oberlinia senior supper senior supper video art art museum amam Allen Memorial Art Museum